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Showing posts with label business of modeling. Show all posts
Showing posts with label business of modeling. Show all posts

Friday, April 13, 2018

Industry Powerhouse Seeks to Improve Standards for the Business of Modeling




Read full article at the link above.



Industry changes are happening, albeit very slowly, to improve the working conditions and standards of modeling and on-set life, and now actions are being taken by industry powerhouses to address the issues of payment and non-payment of models.  

It is common for models to be nearly always in debt to their agencies, or in a holding pattern to be paid for work they have done.  Agencies charge for expenses that are often not accounted for with receipts for the model and withhold pay for ninety days or longer after a job, oftentimes putting the model in a vulnerable financial position which removes all power she has over her career and relationship with the agency.  It can be much worse for foreign models who are away from home and family, and who have a language barrier.  

To be clear, agents send invoices to clients the day a job is completed, and demand payment within one week if not sooner.  They then use that money to cover the agency overhead such as salaries and operating expenses.  When the model requests her fee she is told that the client hasn’t paid, and the agency will delay for three or more months before making any payment to the model.  After they take their percentage and the model’s owed expenses such as for rent, comp cards, and travel, the model may receive a payment.  Sometimes models are told that they have so much debt with the agency that they will not be paid at all.  Models are often made to feel like they have no right to ask for their earnings, and that they should not expect receipts for billed expenses.  The agency has complete control over the model’s financial situation which in turn means where she lives, where she travels for work, and her budget for food, and transportation.  

The industry has gone unchecked or monitored for decades and these sort of payment practices are not acceptable today.  The industry is dated in its treatment of its workers, and the time has come for regulation.  Freelance does not mean free. Agents do not work for free, and neither do models. 

Please seek advice through www.modelalliance.org to know your rights, to be informed, and to ask for legal help for any modeling industry issues you are experiencing. 

                                                        XOXO Shelley


#modelrights #businessofmodeling #modelingindustry #modelpayment #modelindustrystandards #modellegalrights #facethis.blogspot.com #ShelleyGoodstein

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Supermodel Kate Upton Calls Out Paul Marciano of Guess for Sexual Harassment


The fashion and modeling industries were in a negative spotlight this past week when supermodel Kate Upton accused Paul Marciano of the mega-brand Guess of sexual harassing her after grabbing her breasts when she was eighteen years old, clearly taking advantage of his power and position over the young model.  


Rather than a situation of “he said, she said” the incident was witness and corroborated by fashion photographer Yu Tsai.  Upton told her agency about the initial incident and rather than receiving their support, she was led to believe she had to “pay to play”, and that this was normal in the fashion business.  Insulting her vocally on set by calling her “a pig” added to the abuse.  It brings to question the entire culture of fashion advertising, including the actual production of the images.  Surely Marciano’s comments did not fall upon deaf ears, and yet not one person stood up for Upton or called into question her treatment.  


Upton has bravely come forward and shared her story in the media, putting a spotlight on a part of her life that she has managed to cope with, relegating it to her past.  In no was is Kate’s experience unique or atypical in the modeling industry. Nearly every model has experienced some sort of harassment and lack of support. Young models need to understand that predatory behavior and abuse of power to exploit young people is not acceptable.  


When other supermodels come forward with their own allegations and experiences and make Upton’s voice not a solo but a chorus, it will surely begin to balance the power between models and the industry.  The more influential the model, the more attention will be drawn to the prevalence of this predatory behavior, and the industry’s lack of desire to correct it.  What the fashion and modeling industry will look like, how it will function, and how transparent will become depends on the courage of these models who name names, agents who support their models and seek to protect them, and when designers, editors, and studios finally respect the model's human rights.  Only then will their be a positive change in the business. 


I firmly believe there is potential to denounce this culture of sexual harassment and abuse, and the subsequent ignorance and lack of defense for the models, and to shine a light on the truly status-quo-altering talent and creative vision that shape the world of fashion, editorial, and advertising, a process in which the models play a critical role.  

If you are a model, know that you have a right to be respected.  Agencies must listen and take a proactive approach if a model has allegations of abuse or harassment.  Speak up and don’t be afraid to protect yourself.  Success achieved at great personal expense can lead to health and wellbeing issues.  Talk to other models, be fearless, and stand up for yourself and your future.  It’s not only about your career as a model, but as a woman, and a valuable human being.


Kate Upton news via Vogue:  Vogue.com

Kate Upton on Yahoo news:  yahoo.com

                                                      XOXO Shelley


#KateUpton #KateUptoncallsoutPaulMarcianoofGuess #KateUptonsexualabuseallegations #businessofmodeling #sexualharassmentinthemodelingindustry #sexualharassmentinthefashionindustry #facethis.blogspot.com #ShelleyGoodstein 

Saturday, February 3, 2018

Condé Nast International Announces Code Of Conduct


The culture of the fashion and modeling world is in the early stages of a polar shift, as the #metoo movement filters over into the industry, exposing the darker side of the business, naming predators and perpetrators, and all those complicit either by acceptance of a status quo or by denying victims and voice and justice.

All models, at any stage of their career can be victimized, simply because they do not know their rights, their vulnerability, language barriers, their need to work at all costs, and the long-held belief that models have to pay to play.  Steps are being taken to finally change the industry to acknowledge models’ right to respect, dignity, adherence to labor laws, and justice when their rights are violated, without a loss of reputation, or work.  Powerhouse publisher Conde Nast has created a Code of Conduct that will define all their productions going forward, creating a benchmark for the rest of the industry to follow suit.  




In the wake of sexual harassment allegations in Hollywood and more recently in fashion, Condé Nast International has published behavioural guidelines for partners working on Condé Nast shoots.

Condé Nast International has issued a new Code of Conduct, effective immediately, to safeguard the dignity and well-being of all who work with its brands. The guidelines, which will be rolled out to partners in all owned and operated markets, stipulate that:

- All models on set must be 18 years old. Where exceptions need to be made - such as when children are essential a story - they must be accompanied by an agency-provided chaperone.

- Any shoot requiring nudity, sheer clothing, lingerie, swimwear, animals, simulated drug or alcohol use or sexually suggestive poses must be signed off in advance by the subject. No shoot participant may be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs.

A private dressing space must be provided to every subject on set. At all other times, subjects should not be left alone with a photographer, makeup artist or any other participant any time during a shoot.

Condé Nast U.S. and Condé Nast International began work on the Code - an update to the Model Health Initiative in place since 2012 - in October, following a New York Times report outlining decades of sexual harassment allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein. To develop the guidelines, Condé Nast spoke with more than 150 bookers, publicists, agents, models, stylists, editors and others working across the publishing spectrum.

“We are committed to collaborating to find solutions to the problem of sexual harassment in our industry,” says Jonathan Newhouse, chairman and chief executive of Condé Nast International. “By adopting these recommendations all those involved in the creative process will be doing their part to ensure a safe and respectful work environment.”
In conjunction with the new guidelines, a committee of senior Condé Nast executives has been established to review any complaints brought forward. Should the committee discover any violations to the Code did occur, the company pledges to immediately terminate its working relationship with the individual in violation, and ensure that all other necessary steps will be taken.

Read the Code of Conduct in full below.

Condé Nast Code of Conduct: No Harassment or Discrimination

Everyone working on projects for Condé Nast should be treated with dignity and respect. All work done for Condé Nast must be performed in a professional manner, free of any form of discrimination or harassment. Any inappropriate conduct toward others, including but not limited to that based on an individual’s sex, race, color, weight, body shape, size, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, marital or domestic-partnership status, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression, will not be tolerated.

We expect that all companies and vendors working with Condé Nast have clearly communicated equal employment opportunity and anti-harassment policies. Condé Nast may request a copy of these policies.

Shoot Guidelines

Photo and video shoots must be professional environments. Any disrespectful or inappropriate conduct toward others, including but not limited to that based on an individual’s sex, race, colour, weight, body shape, size, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, marital or domestic-partnership status, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression, will not be tolerated. 

Every shoot performed for Condé Nast must adhere to the following guidelines:

· All models must be at least 18 years old. Exceptions will be made for subjects appearing as themselves as part of a profile or news report. In the event a shoot calls for subjects younger than 18, a chaperone must be provided by the agency, and the agency must ensure compliance with any applicable labour laws, including child labour laws.

· All work performed during a photo or video shoot must be in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, including but not limited to labour, wage and hour, and immigration laws.

· Photo shoot participants may not be under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs (including unauthorised prescription drugs), and the consumption or use of alcohol and illegal drugs (including the misuse of prescription drugs) on the premises of a shoot is strictly prohibited.

· A brief describing any nudity, sheer clothing, lingerie, swimwear, animals, simulated drug or alcohol use or sexually suggestive poses planned to be incorporated in a shoot will be distributed to all concerned parties and must be agreed to in advance by the subject of the images. All attendees at the shoot will be notified of any planned nudity.

· A private dressing space must be available to everyone appearing in a shoot.

· If sheer clothing is to be included, appropriate undergarments must be provided unless otherwise agreed to in advance by the subject of the images.
· Any concerns a subject has regarding the amount of skin exposure of wardrobe must be considered, and no subject should be pressured to expose themselves more than they feel comfortable.

· While Condé Nast maintains control over creative and aesthetic decisions, any concerns of a subject’s agent or other representative should be given respectful consideration.

· We recommend that a model should not be alone with a photographer, makeup artist or other contributor participating in a Condé Nast shoot.

· Throughout the shoot, including any related travel, photographers and videographers may not shoot anyone engaged by or through Condé Nast other than as requested by Condé Nast.


All participants in a photo or video shoot must act professionally and refrain from harassment of any kind. Unacceptable conduct includes but is not limited to the following:

· Sexual advances or propositions.

· Any type of sexual activity or contact.

· Any suggestion, direct or implied, that submission to or rejection of sexual advances will affect an individual’s ability to perform services for the shoot or any other Condé Nast project.

· Display of pornographic or obscene material.

· Offensive comments regarding a person’s sex, race, color, weight, body shape, size, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression, including epithets and slurs.

· Physical threats or assaults.

Anyone who has concerns about conduct occurring on a photo shoot may contact the Condé Nast contact listed on the call sheet for the shoot that has been provided and/or posted on-set.


I am optimistic that other publications, brands, studios, and agencies will adapt these guidelines, as more models speak out, find their voice, and demand the respect that is anyone’s right in any other industry.  The fashion and modeling industries have a culture that puts the balance of power anywhere except in the hands of the model, taking away basic human rights for someone to earn a living without compromising their health, safety, and respect.  If you are model who has been victimized, you can find support through the Model Alliance at www.modelalliance.org .  We hear you.  We support you.  


                                                           XOXO Shelley


#condenastcodeofconduct #businessofmodeling #businessoffashion #condenast #metoo #modelsrights #facethis.blogspot.com #shelleygoodstein

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Jumpstart your Modeling Career: the steps you need to do now to make 2018 your best year ever


There is no better time than the new year to kick start your modeling career and to take things up a notch, making 2018 your breakout year. It can be hard to get back into the swing of things and even know what you should be doing to elevate yourself and your career after the holidays, so I have compiled a list to help you hit the ground running:


Reach out to all your agencies in an email, or drop in if they are local to you.  Send them all your new images in hi-res so they can update your online portfolio.  Express your commitment to your career, your desire to travel to different markets, and your ambitions.  Ask them to help you reach out and see what other markets and agents would be good for you.  Make sure they have all your current sizes, updated digitals or polaroids, test shots, tear sheets, contact info, and all the tools they need to help you succeed.  


Commit to working out and actually do it.  It is good for your body, your health, your modeling prospects, your mind, and your stress levels.


Get a hair trim to maintain your hair in good condition for work, or consider a new haircut to change your image, but always ask the agency first. Start doing regular facials at home to maintain a good complexion, so you will always be ready for shoots.



Eat well, drink less alcohol and don’t smoke - your career depends on it.  You must maintain a good weight with healthy eating to be strong and able to actually do the job, and alcohol and smoking destroys your skin and makes you look old and haggard. 


Commit to increasing your social media presence.  Set a schedule for posting, follow industry pros such as top and emerging photographers, hair and makeup artists, magazines, editors, stylists, brands, designers, and other models. “Like” and comment regularly.  Do Instagram “stories”.  Always follow your agency guidelines when posting.


If you are trying to find an agent or get scouted, do updated research to identify the best agents, agencies, and scouts, and follow their submissions guidelines to the letter. 

A new year requires a new commitment if you want to take your career to new heights.  Put some energy into it and you will see results.  Put it out there into the universe and ask for help to make your dreams come true.  Be smart about it and treat it like a business and watch your career take off.  Good luck in 2018!

                                                                XOXO Shelley

All photos Kaia Gerber

#newyearsresolutions #modelingcareer #jumpstartyourmodelingcareer #businessofmodeling #modeling #newfaces #getintomodeling #getscouted #facethis.blogspot.com #ShelleyGoodstein

Friday, October 13, 2017

The Breakout Models of the Spring / Summer 2018 Fashion Weeks Season


The exhausting, exhilarating, frenetic, inspiring month of Spring / Summer 2018 fashion weeks is done.  Reviews are in and orders placed.  Editors are holding the pieces they hope to include in upcoming editorials, and designers have already begun their Fall / Winter collections. The designers and celebrities are not the only stars of the past month.  A crop of standout models, many in their first show season, has captured the eyes of fashion and beauty brands, editors and photographers.  Creating buzz on a noisy stage is difficult at best, so kudos these women who managed to enchant, intrigue, and make a memorable impression – no easy feat when nearly all the models in a particular show wear the same hair and makeup. 





Sometimes it is a fresh haircut, a quirky look, a powerful walk, or an incredible body that sets a model apart.  It is a particularly good period in the industry for models who are different, as the pendulum slowly swings away from the “clone” models of the last decade.  With the emergence of social media influencers, celebrity offspring, and street style models appearing on runways and in campaigns, the cult of personality is gradually making its way back into the fashion and beauty industries. 







We hope this means less of a “disposable” model career timeline where young teens have one amazing season and then disappear.  Let them grow up and evolve and be real contributors in a more meaningful way to brands.  We are rooting for these models and we can’t wait to see them in prestigious editorials, fronting the best magazines, and on many future runways. 




                                                                XOXO  Shelley


#breakout models for Spring Summer 2018 #fashion week #fashion month #top new faces #Kaia Gerber #Faretta #Sijia Kang #Emm Arruda #Birgit Kos #Samile Bermannelli #Chloe gal Laigah Omar #Fran Summers #Adwoa Aboah #Cara Taylor #business of modeling #facethis.blogspot.com #Shelley Goodstein